Posted by on Jul 7, 2015 in Journal | 5 comments

Having recently changed to acrylic paints after many years of painting in oils, I have been experimenting with different approaches. I began four paintings, each with a different approach. To have a look at one of those approaches, you can go to my last blog post. I even began a painting that I was pretty sure would fail. (And I think it has. More about that in a later post.)

But after months of experimenting, I am very happy to say that I feel clear in my direction. I know what I want to paint and how I want to paint it. I feel a rush of energy to begin my new series!

Gessoing the support board

Gessoing the support board

When I am ready to start a new painting I choose an idea from the many sketches in my studio journals. Once I choose, I decide on a size and materials. In this case I am painting on board. I then need to prepare the board. Above I am applying gesso, a primer for painting.

Altering the gesso colour

Altering the gesso colour

After I coated it in a white coat of gesso, I remembered that I had coloured gesso. I often like to begin from a mid tone rather than a white base, as that way I can go lighter and darker in tone more easily, and don’t have to waste time trying to cover up the white.

I wasn’t happy with the Gum Tree Green so I added some sepia drawing ink (also acrylic based) to change the colour.

terra verte green prepared boards

terra verte green prepared boards

I was quite happy with the colour then. It reminds me of terre verte, a traditional underpainting colour. Now I have two new painting supports ready to go.

I will be painting larger than I did in my ‘Daughters of Gaia’ series.

drawing out the painting

drawing out the painting

Now I am drawing out one of the paintings. The drawing on the left is an enlarged photocopy of the original sketch from my studio journal. Rather than transfer the drawing I have elected to redraw it. That way I can make alterations as I go along. I am constantly redrawing and refining while I am painting.


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